About your Search

20100901
20100930
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11
30 years in prison for a crime they say they never committed. >>> great to have you with us, everybody. just weeks before the midterm elections both republicans and democrats are trying to figure out whether the tea party movement will help or hurt them. there's so much discontent over the economy and high unemployment that americans are telling us in poll after poll that the status quo just won't work any more. in the politco george washington battleground poll only 28% said the country was headed in the right direction. 63% said it was on the wrong track. a brand-new poll out today gives us insights as to how they're feeling about the tea party. chief washington correspondent nora nor norah o'donnell joins me now. tell me what it gives us as we're heading into november. >> it reflects what we've seen in our poll, a lot of americans are fed up with the direction of this country. they don't trust washington. they don't trust big institutions. and they want change. and then you see segments of the voting population that not only want change, but they are mad as hell and that
to us. i am going to ask a question to you. we were one of the allies of the united states or the west. would we be treated the same way by the agency? >> the iaea -- >> translator: the iaea, yes. >> the iaea treats -- >> translator: please, please, let me finish. the iaea visit or inspect nuclear facilities or provide any report from those in france or the united states. do they have any access to those facilities? they have no access to those facilities in these countries. >> according to the united nations -- the iaea has, in fact, found grounds for a special procedures in the case of iran, and there are years of sanctions that attest to the fact that iran has not, in the eyes of the world, agreed. in the eyes of russia and china, the strongest allies on the security council. will you let the inspectors in? or if you don't, is there a risk of further hostility? >> translator: we are going to do everything within the framework of the law. we have already allowed them to inspect our facilities, and the iaea has visited our facilities a few times. they should value our opposition. if t
'll read your-mails during mfrp news you can't use" on "morning joe" which starts right now. >>> i don't think health care is driving this election, david. i think economy is driving this election. people have anxiety about that economy. i'll tell you what -- >> then why did you do health care and spend so much of last year on health care? >> they don't want -- well, you know why we worked on health care? because health care was a huge -- is and was a huge problem in this country. >> yet democrats are not campaigning on it because it's so polically toxic. you said that wouldn't be the case. you said it would get more popular, not less. >> i think that health care overtime is going to become more popular. >>> welcome to "morning joe." happy monday. mika, that's what i keep thinking about myself. >> what this. >> that one day, one day i'm going to get more popular. my mom tells me. >> you're so popular. you're the most popular boy in school. >> no, my mom says i'm not because they're jealous of me. one day, like health care reform -- >> 21st century is only 10% over. >> that's right, tha
's terry sanders following the story joining us live from ft. lauderdale, florida. the state with the highest second foreclosure rate since the month of august. what is the situation like? >> i came here as a perfect example. the home over shoulder, these are about $700,000. this one here is in foreclosure. now it's on a short sale. $380,000. this neighborhood was built with, they thought 70 homes. eight are in foreclosure. others in stages of foreclosure. look at the statistics here. it tells you the story of what's going on in the united states. one of every 81 homes in the united states are now in some stage of foreclosure. take a look at the states. nevada, one in 81 in foreclosure. florida, 1 in 155 in foreclosure. arizona, 1 in 165 in foreclosure. when you look at which states are responsible for most of the foreclosures in the country, california, has the greatst percentage. then florida, michigan, illinois and arizona. where i am, i'm in south florida, the statistics are worse, 1 in 111 homes down here in south florida is in some stage of foreclosure. it used to be sh
caught in this situation, that the immediate threat, this is the way it appears to us based on the facts we have, that the immediate threat to the people who work inside johns hopkins nelson building, that threat is now not a problem. so clint, we're keeping our eye on the situation. we'll keep our viewers up to date if we get more information that makes it seem like it's an ongoing problem there. thank you for your help, as well. >> okay, contessa. >>> the fight in congress over your money is now reaching fevered pitch. democrats and republicans have put up their dukes over middle-class tax cuts. and both sides are using that as ammunition for election day. the president called on congress once again to extend a tax cut for the middle class. but republicans want to extend the bush tax cuts for everyone. including the super wealthy. >> that this is not the time to increase taxes on anyone. >> vice president biden says the white house won't back down on this fight, either. biden says the tax money won't matter to people making millions of dollars. but for the middle-class, it could mean t
, but no impact at the end of the race. >> we also have with us msnbc and "time" magazine senior political analyst mark halprin joining the conversation this morning. coming up today richard holbrooke is going to be here. >> wow. >> yes, uh-huh. peter king from nbc's "football night in america." >> yes. >> and broadway star patti lupone to round things out. >> what does that mean, yes! >> speaking of football, a couple of things. first of all vanderbilt, vandy, it ain't easygoing in to oxford on a saturday night with 23,000 screaming fans. >> at the new hampshire institute of politics we met someone who says gave you a shout-out. >> a lot of vanderbilt fans. secondly, seriously, wow, let's give them love, the jets. >> oh, the jets, yes. >> the jets deserve some love as well. >> they changed the way they play, started throwing the ball. sanchez looked great all of the sudden. >> it's great. stop talking and afterwards you see the press conference with rex. they're going to do a video called the super bowl shuffle. they're going to film it tomorrow. it's going to be out -- they're actually recruited
reports are that the first suspect was using an automatic weapon. >> yeah, that initial report, thomas, now, again, we don't have that from law enforcement. so t could be anywhere from what you and i know to be a semiautomatic pistol all the way up to something like an automatic rifle, for example, an ak-47. we just don't know right now. what we do know is that this first individual, evidentally was making some kind of statement first by firing these rounds and, unfortunately, we said he fired them in the area, didn't shoot at anyone in particular but he turned the weapon on himself and killed himself. this second person he was allegedly seen with was that a friend or just another student or could that be another gunman? well, on that campus they just can't take the chance. right now you have this major search going on and you've got 50,000 students plus faculty and staff either hunkered down, locking themselves in place or being told to stay away from campus until this is resolved. >> clint, we'll ask you to stick with us throughout the hour as we get more information on this breaking
to minimize what he had done so you could use that hopefully as a hook to get him out. i kl only speculate. i would much rather investigate. you may speculate he felt whatever injury or condition his relative, perhaps his mother had, was so severe that he made a decision, a horrible decision to take her life and then to take his own. >> thank you very much, clint. this is stephanie rollins blank. she's the mayor in baltimore. we're hoping to get the latest information about this standoff that lasted for about four hours. it ended with two people killed. let's listen. >> closer. close closer. >> i was very troubled today to learn of the incident here at john hopkins. john hopkins is a very proud baltimore institution. our largest private employer and the best medical institution on the planet. we must protect protect these assets. a unified incident command was established. all appropriate law enforcement, city agencies and john hopkins officials worked together to respond. again, immediately to this incident. again, the importance of john hopkins university, the whole community cannot be over
things to recede and that is just huge, huge news for this area. still, though, some problems on u.s. 17. it is closed down in brunswick county north and south people trying to get to and from ard time doing so. power outages up now to 14,000 between north and south carolina and reports of an injury near the queens lake area as a large tree has fallen on a car. we're going to see another wave of rain this afternoon and some of it will be accompanied by winds that could gust to 50 miles per hour and that's the kind of wind, especially for the saturated soils that will take down these trees and have these power outages continuing to increase. by tomorrow we hope to have the sun back for you, something that you deserve after historic rain here in southern south carolina. back to you. >> let's go back to bill karins because he was following the track of this storm and the impact it was having. i woke up early and saw on the local news the traffic mrb prob it is causing. >> now the problems from d.c. up to new york. that is the area of concern, especially around baltimore add this time. you c
's tracie potts has more for us from washington. good morning to you. >> good morning. no decision on taxes. democratic leaders on both sides of congress said they would adjourn without dealing with that issue whether or not to extend the bush tax cuts past the end of this year. the house barely made it out, though, by one vote in what ended up being a referendum on taxes. after an impassioned speech by house minority leader john boehner, 39 democrats agreed with him but in the end decided to leave washington without dealing with that issue. but there was a flurry of activity on several other fronts. a nasa bill passed that will deal with the future of that program. major changes. it appears the shuttle and space station programs. also the house agreed to pass a bill to provide health care for 9/11 workers, for those who worked down at ground zero. finally, they agreed to a budget stop-gap measure that will allow the government to continue operating past today, which is the end of the fiscal year. so now lawmakers head home and they're dealing with an angry electorate just weeks before nove
reach a boiling point. nbc's tracie potts joins us now from capitol hill. good morning. >> good morn pentagon. it's going to be a big day, a big week and a big season headed into the elections as congress tries to figure out whether or not to extend these bush tax cuts that are expiring at the end of the year. now, coming out of the weekend republican leader john boehner who had been critical of the president's plan signaled that he might support it in order to get something done before these tax cuts expire. but all hopes of a compromise were dashed when his party came out very strongly yesterday and said that these tax cuts must be preserved for everyone, the poor, the middle class, and, yes, the wealthy. those who make over $250,000. his party is not the only group to support that. we now know of at least three democrats who say, look, this is the wrong time with our economy still not on good footing to raise taxes. we need to preserve these tax cuts for everyone. so it's a fight not only against republicans but against some members of the democratic party as well. lynn? >> thanks
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)